Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

Cinnamon allergy: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

Cinnamon is a mild spice that adds flavor to a wide range of sweet and savory dishes. However, some people have an allergy to this spice and should not use it.

Cinnamon comes from the inner bark of several trees that are native to China, India, and Southeast Asia.

It’s a popular ingredient in many foods, drinks, and personal care products.

The spice has been popular for many centuries, not only for its flavor but also for its medicinal properties and its range of health benefits.

However, a few people will experience an allergic reaction. These people have a high sensitivity to the proteins in the spice.

Share on PinterestCinnamon comes as whole sticks or powder, or it may be a hidden ingredient in a ready-made food.

Cinnamon is present in a wide range of foods and drinks, including:

  • baked goods
  • puddings and desserts
  • ice-cream
  • candy and chewing gum
  • breakfast cereals and cereal bars
  • foods such as curries and flavored rice
  • spice blends such as Chinese five spice or garam masala
  • soups and sauces
  • herbal teas, specialty coffees, and other drinks
  • restaurant and takeout meals

People should be aware that cinnamon may not appear directly in a list of ingredients on a food product.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allow producers to list some ingredients, including cinnamon, under headings such as “flavors,” “spices,” or “flavoring.” Cinnamon may also be listed on labels as “cassia” or “mixed spice.”

Cinnamon may also be present in personal hygiene products, such as:

  • toothpaste
  • mouthwash
  • fragrances and perfumes

The label may only show “fragrance” or “flavoring,” rather than “cinnamon.”

Share on PinterestSymptoms of an allergy include nausea and dizziness. If anyone has difficulty breathing, this could be anaphylaxis, a medical emergency.

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI), approximately 2 to 3 percent of those with food allergies live with a spice allergy.

Most commonly, spices cause a non-allergic reaction-such as a rash or a cough from inhaling the spice.

Rarely, people report anaphylaxis. This is a severe allergic reaction.

Reactions can occur during or after breathing, eating, or even touching the spice.

They vary between people, and they can range from mild to severe.

Some common symptoms include:

  • nausea
  • stomach pain
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • tingling, itching or swelling of the face or other parts of the body
  • difficulty breathing
  • hives
  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • rashes, inflammation, irritation, or blistering of the skin

In rare cases, a cinnamon allergy may cause anaphylaxis, a potentially fatal, severe allergic reaction.

Anaphylaxis needs urgent medical attention.

Symptoms include:

  • a sudden drop in blood pressure
  • difficulty breathing
  • loss of consciousness
  • shock

Without treatment, it can lead to coma or death.

An anaphylactic reaction may occur in the seconds or minutes after exposure to an allergen. Occasionally, it can take place 30 minutes or more after exposure.

People who have a cinnamon allergy need to take care, because cinnamon is common in cooking and cosmetics.

The ACAAI note that people who are living with a spice allergy can experience a low quality of life, restrictive diets, and possibly malnutrition as they attempt to avoid trigger foods.

People who have a cinnamon allergy should work closely with an allergist to manage their condition. A nutritionist or dietician may help them to ensure they meet their nutritional needs.

Other strategies for living with a cinnamon allergy include paying close attention to product labels when shopping, preparing meals when possible, and informing any restaurant staff of allergies when dining out.

Cinnamon replacement options for cooking

Share on PinterestPeople add cinnamon to both sweet and savory foods, including baked goods. Ginger, nutmeg, and other spices can replace it.

People can replace cinnamon with similar spices when cooking at home.

Possible substitutes include:

  • allspice
  • anise
  • caraway
  • cloves
  • fennel
  • ginger
  • mace
  • nutmeg
  • vanilla

When people prepare food at home, they can be more certain about which ingredients they include. However, items such as “mixed spice” and cake mixes may still contain cinnamon.

People who have reactions to multiple foods or unrelated foods may have a reaction to cinnamon.

If reactions occur after consuming pre-packaged or restaurant foods but do not occur after eating homemade versions of the same items, they could be due to a spice allergy.

It is important to remember that reactions can develop after touching or inhaling cinnamon and other spices. People should check personal care products and other household items thoroughly to see if they contain cinnamon.

Keeping a record of the foods, drinks, and other items that trigger symptoms can be very helpful when diagnosing allergies.

Working with a doctor or allergy specialist is important when diagnosing a cinnamon allergy.

These healthcare professionals can recommend suitable blood tests, skin prick tests, or diets to find the allergen accurately.

An allergy occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly identifies a specific substance in a food as harmful. The body then releases certain antibodies to destroy the allergen.

When the person consumes the food again — even in tiny quantities — the antibodies immediately signal the release of chemicals. These cause the various allergy symptoms.

An intolerance to a particular food can cause many of the same symptoms as a true allergy, but the antibodies will not be present.

Symptoms that can occur with spice that are a sign of an intolerance rather than an allergy may include:

  • a skin rash
  • itching in the mouth
  • coughing after breathing in the spice

Many people with an intolerance can eat limited amounts of their problem foods without having any adverse reactions.

It is best to work with an allergist or doctor to figure out the difference between a cinnamon allergy and a cinnamon intolerance.

Treatment usually involves limiting exposure to cinnamon or completely avoiding it.

To relieve symptoms of an allergic reaction, a doctor may recommend the use of an antihistamine medication, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl).

When a person has a food allergy diagnosis, a doctor or allergist may give them a prescription for an epinephrine auto-injector. If anaphylaxis or severe breathing problems occur, this can relieve symptoms until emergency medical help arrives.

The ACAAI recommend that children with a cinnamon or other allergy and their caretakers should also carry an epinephrine auto-injector, in case a reaction happens outside the home. Their school teachers and other responsible adults should know about the child’s allergy.

Many schools have a supply of epinephrine to use in an emergency.

When to see a doctor

People should contact a doctor if they suspect a cinnamon or other food allergy. In cases of anaphylaxis, people should seek emergency medical assistance.

  • Allergy
  • Food Allergy
  • Respiratory
  • Nutrition / Diet

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/313325

Sugar and spice and everything not so nice: Spice allergy affects foodies and cosmetic users a

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

Imagine a world where you could never dine away from home, wear makeup, smell of sweet perfumes or eat a large percentage of food on store shelves.

According to allergists at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting that is kicking off today in Anaheim, Calif.

, that is the world for 2 to 3 percent of individuals living with a spice allergy.

Spices are one of the most widely used products found in foods, cosmetics and dental products. The U.S.

Food and Drug Administration does not regulate spices, meaning they often are not noted on food labels, making spices possibly the most difficult allergen to identify or avoid.

According to rough estimates, spice allergy is responsible for 2 percent of food allergies. However it is underdiagnosed, particularly due to the lack of reliable allergy skin tests or blood tests.

“While spice allergy seems to be rare, with the constantly increasing use of spices in the American diet and a variety of cosmetics, we anticipate more and more Americans will develop this allergy,” said allergist Sami Bahna, M.D., ACAAI past president. “Patients with spice allergy often have to go through extreme measures to avoid the allergen. This can lead to strict dietary avoidance, low quality of life and sometimes malnutrition.”

In his presentation, Dr. Bahna noted that due to the wide use of spice in cosmetics, women are more ly to develop spice allergy. Makeup, body oils, toothpaste and fragrances can all include one or more spices. Those with birch pollen or mugwort (a traditional herbal medicine used to relieve inflammatory conditions) allergy are also more prone to spice allergy.

Common spice allergy triggers include cinnamon and garlic, but can range from black pepper to vanilla. Several spice blends contain anywhere from three to 18 spices, and the hotter the spice, the greater the chance for allergy.

“Boiling, roasting, frying and other forms of applying heat to spices may reduce allergy causing agents, but can also enhance them depending on the spice,” said Dr. Bahna. “Because of this allergy's complexity, allergists often recommend a treatment plan that includes strict avoidance which can be a major task.”

An allergic reaction can be caused from breathing, eating or touching spices. Symptoms range from mild sneezing to a life-threating allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. According to Dr. Bahna, spice allergy should be suspected in individuals that have multiple reactions to unrelated foods, or those that react to foods when commercially prepared but not when cooked at home.

Even someone that is allergic to only one known spice can have a reaction to several spice blends. According to Dr. Bahna's presentation, there are several unique characteristics about spice blends, including:

  • A Five-Spice blend has seven spices, yet Allspice has one
  • The same blend name doesn't mean same components
  • There are several types of Curry, each is a different blend of many spices

Those that suspect they may have a spice allergy should see a board-certified allergist for proper diagnosis and a custom-made management plan. Patients should carefully keep track of what foods and other products trigger their allergy with MyNasalAllergyJournal.org.

Information about allergies and asthma can be found at AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org. More news and research from the annual meeting, being held Nov. 8-13, 2012 can be followed via at #ACAAI.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121108073639.htm

Cinnamon Allergy Symptoms, Cause, Treatment & Food to Avoid

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

Cinnamon is a wonderful, aromatic and a versatile spice with many health benefits and medicinal properties. Its ability to manage, treat and heal various diseases and ailments makes it a ‘super-food’.

This spice is harvested from the bark of the trees, which are native to Southeast Asia, China and India. But this herb is not fit for everyone’s consumption. People who are allergic to cinnamon must stay away from food preparations containing cinnamon.

Such individuals may experience adverse health reactions after consuming or touching cinnamon.

Spice allergies are hard to detect, and they often go undiagnosed. Eating, smelling or even touching this spice can trigger an allergic response in sensitive individuals.

Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamic alcohol are compounds present in cinnamon, which are responsible for its fragrance. Both compounds are responsible for allergic contact dermatitis in hypersensitive individuals.

Cinnamaldehyde is a more potent skin sensitizer than cinnamic alcohol.

In individuals who are allergic to cinnamon, the body’s immune system reacts with defense mechanism when exposed to cinnamaldehyde present in cinnamon. The body identifies cinnamaldehyde as an allergen and produces antibodies against it. The mast cells release ‘histamine’, a substance that triggers an allergic response in the body.

Allergies are common among babies because they have a weak immune system. Exposure to cinnamon can cause an allergic reaction or skin irritation in babies.  Such an allergic reaction is usually topical in babies and allergic symptoms can appear within minutes after the skin is exposed to cinnamon.

Symptoms of Cinnamon Allergy

Symptoms are triggered when cinnamon is consumed or when it comes in direct contact with the skin. Smelling this aromatic herb can also cause symptoms.

Gastrointestinal Symptoms:

When cinnamon is eaten as a part of a food preparation, it can cause gastrointestinal symptoms, :

  • Nausea
  • Stomach pain or abdominal discomfort
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea or loose stools

Contact Dermatitis:

It is an allergic skin reaction, which takes place when a person allergic to cinnamon is exposed to it. It causes:

  • Skin inflammation
  • Redness
  • Itching
  • Rashes

Respiratory Symptoms:

If a person allergic to cinnamon comes in contact with cinnamon, it leads to respiratory symptoms, :

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Sneezing
  • Nose running
  • Watery eyes
  • Itching of the eyes
  • Itching of the throat
  • Difficulty in breathing

Contact Stomatitis:

It is a condition in which, inflammation of the oral mucosa is caused by the allergen. This causes:

  • Dysgeusia
  • Burning sensation in the mouth
  • Numbness
  • Itching
  • Excess salivation
  • Pain

Anaphylaxis:

Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening condition, which requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms include:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Rapid pulse
  • Drop in the blood pressure level
  • Difficulty in breathing (1)

Diagnosis and Tests of Cinnamon Allergy

Clinical History:

A detailed food history and dietary recall will help the doctor in diagnosing food allergy. Allergy to spices is difficult to detect.

If you have reactions to multiple foods, there are greater chances of having an allergy to any spice.

If adverse reactions take place after eating restaurant food or packaged foods, but if the same food is consumed, which is cooked at home and there are no reactions, then one should get themselves checked for spice allergies.

Inform the doctor if you have any other food allergy or if any of your family member is allergic to cinnamon.

Describing your symptoms in detail will further put some light on your case.

Keep a record of foods and beverages that trigger symptoms.

Skin Prick Test:

This test helps in diagnosing cinnamon allergy easily. During this test, your allergist pricks your skin with the help of a lancet. The cinnamon allergen is applied at the site of the prick.

If you are allergic to cinnamon, your skin will turn red or a bump may appear because the body produces antibodies against the allergen.

Your allergist will rule out the allergy if there are no skin changes present.

Skin Patch Test:

This test can be done to confirm or rule out cinnamon allergy in children as well as adults. In this test, cinnamon allergen is applied at the back of an individual, in a sealed patch for 48 hours. A positive result is confirmed by the presence of blisters, ulcers, redness, rashes or inflamed skin.

Allergy Blood Test:

This blood test measures immunoglobulin E, an antibody produced by the immune system during an allergy. If the level of immunoglobulin E is high, it indicates that a person is allergic.

Risk Factors

  • Individuals with a family history of cinnamon allergy.
  • History of food allergy in the past, especially during childhood.
  • Having any other type of food allergy.
  • Women who use more of beauty products are at a greater risk because cinnamon is a part of many such products.

Treatment of Cinnamon Allergy

Anti-Histamines: Anti-histamines are drugs that can be used to treat mild symptoms of allergy. These drugs suppress the action of histamine and relieve symptoms.

Epinephrine Auto-Injector: An epinephrine auto-injector is prescribed by the doctor or an allergist. It should be used during anaphylaxis or adverse allergic reactions.

Caution

  • The first and the most important step to prevent cinnamon allergy is to avoid the intake of cinnamon completely.
  • Read the food label carefully before purchasing any food product. Look out for cinnamon in the ingredient list and avoid purchasing it if any food product contains cinnamon.
  • While eating out at a restaurant, inform the staff about your allergy. Ask them not to use cinnamon in your food preparation.
  • Cinnamon oil is used for aromatherapy and massages. Do not opt for such options.
  • Cinnamon and cinnamon oil are also a part of lipsticks and face packs. Be careful before purchasing any such beauty products.
  • Inform the school teacher if your child is allergic to cinnamon.
  • Cinnamon is added to certain toothpastes, candies and chewing gums because it has a pleasant flavor. Avoid using such products.

List of Foods to Avoid

Here is a list of foods to avoid if you are allergic to cinnamon:

  • Cakes
  • Breads
  • Ice-creams
  • Puddings
  • Chewing gums
  • Candies
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Energy bars
  • Cinnamon-flavored tea
  • Cinnamon-flavored coffee
  • Pumpkin spice mix

Source: https://www.ayurtimes.com/cinnamon-allergy/

Sugar And Spice And Everything Not So Nice

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

Spice allergy affects foodies and cosmetic users a

ANAHEIM, CA. (November 8, 2012) Imagine a world where you could never dine away from home, wear makeup, smell of sweet perfumes or eat a large percentage of food on store shelves.

According to allergists at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting that is kicking off today in Anaheim, Calif.

, that is the world for 2 to 3 percent of individuals living with a spice allergy.

Spices are one of the most widely used products found in foods, cosmetics and dental products. The U.S.

Food and Drug Administration does not regulate spices, meaning they often are not noted on food labels, making spices possibly the most difficult allergen to identify or avoid.

According to rough estimates, spice allergy is responsible for 2 percent of food allergies. However it is underdiagnosed, particularly due to the lack of reliable allergy skin tests or blood tests.

“While spice allergy seems to be rare, with the constantly increasing use of spices in the American diet and a variety of cosmetics, we anticipate more and more Americans will develop this allergy,” said allergist Sami Bahna, M.D., ACAAI past president. “Patients with spice allergy often have to go through extreme measures to avoid the allergen. This can lead to strict dietary avoidance, low quality of life and sometimes malnutrition.”

In his presentation, Dr. Bahna noted that due to the wide use of spice in cosmetics, women are more ly to develop spice allergy. Makeup, body oils, toothpaste and fragrances can all include one or more spices. Those with birch pollen or mugwort (a traditional herbal medicine used to relieve inflammatory conditions) allergy are also more prone to spice allergy.

Common spice allergy triggers include cinnamon and garlic, but can range from black pepper to vanilla. Several spice blends contain anywhere from three to 18 spices, and the hotter the spice, the greater the chance for allergy.

“Boiling, roasting, frying and other forms of applying heat to spices may reduce allergy causing agents, but can also enhance them depending on the spice,” said Dr. Bahna. “Because of this allergy s complexity, allergists often recommend a treatment plan that includes strict avoidance which can be a major task.”

An allergic reaction can be caused from breathing, eating or touching spices. Symptoms range from mild sneezing to a life-threating allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. According to Dr. Bahna, spice allergy should be suspected in individuals that have multiple reactions to unrelated foods, or those that react to foods when commercially prepared but not when cooked at home.

Even someone that is allergic to only one known spice can have a reaction to several spice blends. According to Dr. Bahna s presentation, there are several unique characteristics about spice blends, including:

  • A Five-Spice blend has seven spices, yet Allspice has one
  • The same blend name doesn t mean same components
  • There are several types of Curry, each is a different blend of many spices

Those that suspect they may have a spice allergy should see a board-certified allergist for proper diagnosis and a custom-made management plan. Patients should carefully keep track of what foods and other products trigger their allergy with MyNasalAllergyJournal.org.

Information about allergies and asthma can be found at AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org. More news and research from the annual meeting, being held Nov. 8-13, 2012 can be followed via at #ACAAI.

The ACAAI Press Room is located in Room 304B at the Anaheim Convention Center, Nov. 9-12, 2012. To arrange an interview, please contact Christine Westendorf, ACAAI Media Relations Manager, at 847-427-1200 or ChristineWestendorf@acaai.org

Source: https://acaai.org/news/sugar-and-spice-and-everything-not-so-nice

Common Food Allergy Triggers

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

Dip into hot salsa or spicy Indian food, and your nose starts running. Beans give you gas, or a glass of wine means a headache later. If you're lactose intolerant, you expect diarrhea when you eat cheese or milk.

Most people have reactions to foods these from time to time. But they're usually food sensitivities or intolerances. They aren't caused by your immune system.

A food allergy is different. Your body mistakes harmless food as something that could make you sick. When you eat something you're allergic to, your immune system responds to protect you. You might get a mild skin rash or itchy eyes, or you could have a bigger reaction that leaves you gasping for breath.

Food allergies can be serious, but you can take steps to manage them. One of the best things you can do is avoid your trigger foods.

Eight things cause about 90% of food allergy reactions:

Almost any food can trigger an allergy, though. Less common ones include:

  • Corn
  • Gelatin
  • Meat — beef, chicken, mutton, and pork
  • Seeds, often sesame, sunflower, and poppy
  • Spices, such as caraway, coriander, garlic, and mustard

An allergic reaction can happen within minutes of eating, or it may happen hours later.

Mild symptoms can be hard to tie to specific foods. You could get:

  • Red, swollen, dry, or itchy skin rash (hives or eczema)
  • Runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, or a slight, dry cough
  • Itchy, watery, red eyes
  • Itchy mouth or inside your ear
  • Funny taste in your mouth
  • Upset stomach, cramps, throwing up, or diarrhea

Most often, peanuts, nuts, fish, and shellfish cause severe reactions, although any food can. Symptoms include:

Because young children may not know how to describe what's happening, they might say something , “My mouth is tingling,” “My tongue feels heavy,” or “I've got a frog in my throat.” A hoarse or squeaky voice or slurring words are also signs of an allergic reaction in kids.

Sometimes symptoms affect your whole body and are so serious that they're life-threatening. This kind of reaction is called anaphylaxis, and it's a medical emergency. It usually happens a few minutes after you've eaten. If you have asthma as well as a food allergy, you're more ly to have anaphylaxis.

When you have a severe food allergy, you should carry injectable epinephrine (adrenaline) in case you have a reaction. It can ease symptoms until you can get medical attention. Do not hesitate to use the epinephrine auto-injector ever if you are unsure your symptoms are caused by an allergy.

The epinephrine will not hurt you and could save your life.

For highly allergic people, even tiny amounts of a food (for example, 1/44,000 of a peanut kernel) can set off a reaction. Less sensitive people may be able to eat small amounts of their trigger food.

The key to controlling a food allergy? Avoid the problem food. That isn't always easy, though. It may be hidden as an ingredient in something else.

  • Most baked goods, cakes and cookies, are made with eggs and sometimes nuts.
  • Water-packed tuna may have added nonfat dry milk.
  • Salad dressing could be made with soybean oil.
  • A hot dog may contain milk protein.

So, be sure to read food labels. That's a good place to start.

Still, labels don't always tell the whole story. For example, pineapple, milk casein, or hydrolyzed soy protein may be used in microwave popcorn — yet you won't see them on the ingredient list. You'll see the catch-all terms “flavoring” or “natural flavoring” instead. Words “emulsifier” or “binder” can signal soy or egg in the product.

When you have a food allergy, you need to get familiar with these general terms and what specific things they can include. If you have questions about any product, check with the manufacturer. The customer service department or the quality assurance officer should be able to help you figure out if the food is safe for you.

You'll need to read menus at restaurants carefully, too. Ask about how food is prepared before you order if you have any concerns.

SOURCES:

Dee Sandquist, MS, RD; spokesperson, American Dietetic Association.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “Food Allergies and Reactions.”

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “About Food Allergies.”

Food Allergy Research & Education: “Other Allergens,” “Symptoms,” “About Anaphylaxis.”

WebMD Medical Reference in collaboration with The Cleveland Clinic: “Food Allergy and Intolerances.”

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved. Food Allergy Testing

Source: https://www.webmd.com/allergies/food-triggers

IgG Spice Profile

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies
The IgG Spice Profile (*not available in NY) is a blood test that measures antibodies to 24 culinary herbs and spices. The profile also includes a total IgE measurement. The body can react to foods in many different ways.

Adverse food reactions can lead to distressing symptoms and chronic health conditions. Often times it is unknown exactly which food(s) may be the cause and testing can help identify the problematic foods.

Removal of the reactive foods often results in resolution of symptoms.

What is the difference between IgE and IgG-mediated reactions?

The key differences between IgE allergies and IgG sensitivities are summarized below:

IgE-Mediated Allergies(Foods, molds, inhalants) IgG-Mediated Sensitivities(Foods, spices, vegetarian foods)
Immediate onset (minutes to hours)Delayed onset (hours to days)
Circulating half-life of 1-2 daysCirculating half-life of 21 days
Permanent allergiesTemporary sensitivities
Stimulates histamine releaseActivates complementDoes not stimulate histamine release
Hives, stuffy or itchy nose, sneezing, itchy, teary eyes, vomiting, stomach cramps or diarrhea, angioedema or swelling, shortness of breath or wheezing, anaphylaxisGastrointestinal symptoms, headaches, joint aches, rashes, other vague symptoms

When should testing for IgG Spice Antibodies be considered?

Testing for adverse food reactions is useful for individuals who suspect that a food is responsible for causing their symptoms, but can't quite identify which food(s). The presence of circulating antibodies may affect each patient differently.

Circulating IgG food antibodies are not diagnostic for a specific condition, but indicate an immune response to that food. The immune response could be a normal response that would not necessarily cause symptoms. Therefore, test results should always be viewed in the context of the overall clinical picture.

The role of IgG food antibody testing is still being researched, however, studies have shown the benefit of testing in certain conditions.1

Conditions associated with IgG food sensitivity

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)2-4
  • Major Depressive Disorder4
  • Migraine headaches5-7
  • Skin rashes such as eczema8
  • Joint aches9
  • Autoimmune disease10
  • Crohn's Disease11
  • Obesity12

The “Leaky Gut” Connection

The presence of circulating IgG antibodies to foods may be suggestive of increased intestinal permeability, also referred to as “leaky gut syndrome.” When the tight junctions forming the barrier in the gut don't work properly, larger substances can “leak” through, causing an immune response.

This immune response may result in the production of IgG antibodies to foods.4 There are multiple dietary and lifestyle factors that contribute to increased intestinal permeability.

These factors include alcohol,13 stress,14,15 chronic NSAID use,16 Western-type diet (high consumption of red meat, animal fat, high sugar, and low fiber food),17 and prolonged and strenuous exercise.18-20

Ordering the test

The IgG Spice Profile can be ordered as a stand-alone test or bundled with other profiles. Often times, clinicians will bundle several smaller profiles in order to see a more complete picture of the patient's immune-mediated response. Profiles that can be bundled include:

The video below explains how these tests can be bundled.

What advantage does the IgG Spice Antibody test offer compared to other diagnostics?

IgG food antibodies can result in a delayed response to a food.1 Whereas IgE antibodies can result in immediate-hypersensitivity to a substance. It is generally easier for patients and clinicians to identify a food that causes an immediate response.

A delayed-response to food may be more challenging to determine, and testing can be helpful. The IgG Food Antibody test assesses total IgG (1-4) versus only testing for IgG4.

This offers a more complete assessment, however, IgG4 testing is available for clinicians interested in that specific component of IgG.

The body of scientific evidence continues to build regarding correlation with clinical symptoms and conditions for IgG testing (see conditions above).

Furthermore, a study comparing methodologies showed that “IgG ELISA testing is more reliable and consistent than cell size testing for identifying food sensitivities.

“21 Examples of cell size testing or cytotoxic testing include mediator release testing (MRT), antigen leukocyte antibody testing (ALCAT) and lymphocyte response assays.

Other types of adverse food reactions that are not mediated by the immune system are referred to as food intolerances. Food intolerances include lactose intolerance due to lactase enzyme deficiency in the gut; testing is available for suspected lactose intolerance. Testing is not available for all food intolerances.

These include vasoactive amines histamine and tyramine, food additives and preservatives (nitrites, sulfites, MSG, aspartame), salicylates, nightshades, lectins, FODMAPs, oxalates, etc.

Since testing is not available for every type of adverse food reaction, the elimination/rechallenge diet remains the gold standard for identification of symptom-producing foods.

IgG Antibody Testing

In testing food antibodies, Genova uses the sandwich ELISA method to offer semi-quantitative serum levels of IgG antibodies to foods. The relative degrees of IgG present for each food are reported using a semi-quantitative level:

  • negative (none detected)
  • VL (very low)
  • Low (+1)
  • Moderate (+2)
  • High (+3)

In making these assessments, Genova looks at partial proteins, known as epitopes, in order to assess IgG antibody responses. Epitopes are designed to reveal that portion of the protein which most defines the specific food.

There are no standardized, FDA-cleared laboratory assays for the detection of IgG antibodies to food antigens available in the US market. Genova uses commercially-prepared antigens for the IgG food antibody assessment.

Levels of IgG reactivity are standardized to World Health Organization International Standard: Immunoglobulins G, A and M, Human Serum NIBSC code: 67/086.

IgE Antibody Testing

Genova utilizes the FDA-cleared Siemans Immulite® 2000 Total IgE and 3gAllergy Specific IgE Universal Kits. Immulite® 2000 Total IgE is a solid-phase Chemiluminescent assay. Immulite® 3gAllergy Specific IgE is a solid phase, two-step, chemiluminescent immunoassay that exploits liquid phase kinetics in a bead format.

Siemens proprietary liquid allergens are the key to making IMMULITE® 2000 Immunoassay allergy tests sensitive, specific, and reliable. The soluble polymer/copolymer support for the allergens increases the number of binding sites and their accessibility to allergen-specific IgE antibodies.

Enzyme-enhanced chemiluminescent signal detection provides increased sensitivity and the proprietary wash technique enhances specificity.

What can clinicians and patients expect from IgG Spice Antibody testing?

In general, clinical management of the patient with food sensitivities involves elimination or rotation of the highly reactive food(s). Often times, clinicians and patients notice improvement of symptoms after diet modification.

Patients may be able to tolerate the food in small amounts, without symptoms, after several weeks or months of elimination.

Increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut) may simultaneously be addressed with diet, botanicals, and nutraceuticals, as well as modifying the contributing factors.

Please visit our IgG, IgE, and Celiac Tests Prep page prior to ordering the test to learn about medications that may impact test results, length of exposure to antigens, pediatric testing, and diseases that may affect antibody levels.

References

  1. Mullin G, et.al. Testing for Food Reactions: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Nutr in Clin Pract. 2010; 25(2):192-198.
  2. Atkinson W, et. al. Food Elimination IgG Antibodies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Gut. 2004;53:1459-1464.
  3. Drisko J, et. al.

    Treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome with a Food Elimination Diet Followed by Food Challenge and Probiotics. J Amer Col Nutr. 2006;25(6):514-522.

  4. Karakula-Juchnowicz H, et.al. The food-specific serum IgG reactivity in major depressive disorder patients, irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy controls. Nutrients. 2018 Apr;10(5):pii:E548.
  5. Mitchell N, et.

    al. Randomized Controlled Trial of Food Elimination Diet IgG Antibodies for the Prevention of Migraine- Headaches. Nutr J. 2011 May;10:85.

  6. Alpay K, et. al. Diet Restriction in Migraine, IgG Against Foods: A Clinical Double-Blind, Randomized, Cross-Over Trial. Cephalgia. 2010 Jul;30(7):829-37.
  7. Aydinlar E, et.al.

    IgG-Based Elimination Diet in Migraine Plus Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Headache. 2013;53:514-525.

  8. Shakib F, et. al. Study of IgG Sub-Class Antibodies in Patients with Milk Intolerance. Clin Allergy. 1986;16(5):451-458.
  9. Panush RS. Food Induced (“Allergic”) Arthritis: Clinical and Serologic Studies. J Rheumatol. 1990 Mar;17(3):291-4.
  10. Coucke F.

    Food intolerance in patients with manifest autoimmunity. Observational study. Autoimmune Rev. 2018 Nov;17(11):1078-1080.

  11. Bentz S, et. al. Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn's disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study. Digestion. 2010;81(4):252-64.
  12. Wilders-Truschnig M, et. al.

    IgG antibodies against food antigens are correlated with inflammation and intima media thickness in obese juveniles. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 2008 Apr;116(4):241-5.

  13. Purohit V, Bode JC, Bode C, et al. Alcohol, intestinal bacterial growth, intestinal permeability to endotoxin, and medical consequences: summary of a symposium. Alcohol. 2008;42(5):349-361.

  14. Vanuytsel T, van Wanrooy S, Vanheel H, et al. Psychological stress and corticotropin-releasing hormone increase intestinal permeability in humans by a mast cell-dependent mechanism. Gut. 2014;63(8):1293-1299.
  15. Soderholm JD, Perdue MH. Stress and gastrointestinal tract. II. Stress and intestinal barrier function. Am J Physiology Gastro Liver Physiology.

    2001;280(1):G7-g13.

  16. Bjarnason I, Takeuchi K. Intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced enteropathy. J Gastro. 2009;44 Suppl 19:23-29.
  17. Bibbo S, Ianiro G, Giorgio V, et al. The role of diet on gut microbiota composition. Eur Rev Med Pharm Sci. 2016;20(22):4742-4749.
  18. Davison G, Marchbank T.

    Zinc carnosine works with bovine colostrum in truncating heavy exercise-induced increase in gut permeability in healthy volunteers. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;104(2):526-536.

  19. Lamprecht M, Bogner S, Schippinger G, et al.

    Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. J Internat Soc Sports Nutr. 2012;9(1):45.

  20. Pires W, Veneroso CE, Wanner SP, et al. Association Between Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia and Intestinal Permeability: A Systematic Review. Sports Med.

    2017;47(7):1389-1403.

  21. Hodsdon W and Zwickey H. NMJ Original Research: Reproducibility and Reliability of Two Food Allergy Testing Methods. Nat Med J. 2010;2(3):1-13.

NOTES:
† When ordering the IgG Food Antibodies test, it will be listed as “Allergy Antibody” on the Order Menu.
* IgG Food Antibody Assessment is not available in New York.

Source: https://www.gdx.net/product/igg-spices-allergy-test-blood

Cinnamon Allergies in Dogs – Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Spice Allergies

The evergreen tree known as cinnamon is native to the country Sri Lanka. It is also native to India, Burma, and South America. In the West Indies, it was cultivated for its spice from its inner bark that had been dried.

At one time, cinnamon was so valuable because of its many uses; in Egypt it was used for embalming, witchcraft, and essential oils. In medieval times on the continent of Europe, it was popular as a flavoring and also used in religious ceremonies.

Known as the most popular and profitable spice during times of trade, today cinnamon is used for a variety of foods and the enjoyment of the aroma.

This popular spice has a scientific name of Cinnamomum and is a member of the Lauraceae family. Not only is it a very popular, aromatic spice, it is also a beautiful plant used in décor and landscaping. Many people know of cinnamon as being a staple in their kitchen cabinet.

The spice is used for a variety of dishes, including entrées and desserts. It is also used in essential oils and in potpourri for its lovely scent.

Although cinnamon does have many benefits to dogs, occasionally dogs can acquire a reaction from cinnamon potpourri or essential oil of cinnamon.

Cinnamon allergies in dogs occur when a dog is either allergic to cinnamon or cinnamon essential oil. Although this is not severe, it can be irritating to your dog, and veterinary treatment can help.

Symptoms of Cinnamon Allergies in Dogs

Symptoms of an allergic reaction to cinnamon, when used for health issues on your dog, will more than ly be mild. Symptoms may possibly include:

  • Mild diarrhea
  • Upset stomach
  • Skin irritations
  • Redness of the skin
  • Respiratory distress (when powder is inhaled)
  • Low blood sugar
  • Liver disease
  • Abnormal heart rate
  • Salivation
  • Drooling

Types

The benefits of cinnamon are many, but unfortunately dogs may be allergic to this spice. There are many types of uses for cinnamon. Uses may include:

  • Helps regulate blood within dogs that are diabetic
  • Used as a pain reliever
  • Anti-inflammatory uses
  • Raises energy levels
  • Helps dogs which suffer from cancer

Causes of Cinnamon Allergies in Dogs

If you feel your dog would benefit from cinnamon, please contact your veterinarian before adding cinnamon to his diet or administering on his skin. The veterinarian may suggest a small test, such as a skin test, to be sure he does not have a reaction. Causes of cinnamon reactions include:

  • An over-reactive immune system which targets the properties of cinnamon
  • Hypersensitivity to the spice as it touches the skin
  • Chewing on a cinnamon tree
  • The ingestion of foods that contain cinnamon, such as desserts

Diagnosis of Cinnamon Allergies in Dogs

If you see signs of an allergy in your dog, such as skin irritation or a general feeling of illness, make an appointment with your veterinarian. If you know your dog ingested cinnamon or if you applied cinnamon to your dog, such as an oil form, or even if he ate cinnamon potpourri, this will be very important information for your veterinarian.

The veterinarian will perform laboratory testing which may include blood testing, urinalysis, and biochemistry profile.

The veterinarian will also check the blood sugar levels of your dog and will check the liver to see if it is affected.

Depending on your dog’s symptoms, he may also take a look at his lungs if he inhaled a high amount of cinnamon powder. If your dog had a reaction to cinnamon essential oil, your medical professional will take a look at his skin.

A diagnosis of a cinnamon allergy or reaction may be difficult to do if you are unsure that his reactions are caused by cinnamon.

The veterinarian will ask questions pertaining to what he has eaten, if you have applied any topical solutions to his skin, or any other questions that may help him determine a diagnosis.

In some cases, if the dog has ingested cinnamon essential oil or cinnamon potpourri, the cinnamon smell may be on his breath and that may alert the veterinarian to a possible cinnamon toxicity.

Treatment of Cinnamon Allergies in Dogs

Treatment of a cinnamon reaction, toxicity, or allergy, depends solely on the method of contact. Treatment methods may include:

Decontamination

The veterinarian may give your dog a bath using a gentle cleansing solution to remove the cinnamon oil from his skin. He may also apply a topical solution to help ease any irritation of the skin.

IV fluids

If your dog ingested cinnamon and vomited, the veterinarian may administer IV fluids to help with any dehydration your dog may have. IV fluids contain electrolytes and other solutions which may help with any liver damage and low blood sugar.

Observation

Your veterinarian may want to keep your dog overnight, depending on his symptoms. With the amount of cinnamon that he ingested, it will be important for the veterinarian to keep an eye on him and monitor his heart rate and other vital signs.

Halting Exposure

For long-term treatment, halting all exposure to cinnamon will be the one thing you can do for your dog to avoid a cinnamon allergy or any other harsh reaction. Do not feed your dog human food that contains cinnamon, keep them away from cinnamon potpourri, and do not use essential oil on his skin that contains cinnamon.

Recovery of Cinnamon Allergies in Dogs

In terms of recovery, your dog will recover once he is treated. Of course, every dog is different and treatment may take longer for some depending on the reaction. If your dog must stay at the hospital overnight, your veterinarian will keep in contact with you about his recovery.

Your veterinarian may have specific instructions on what you need to do at home in order to continue with any treatment, if needed. The one thing you can do is remove cinnamon from your home or monitor your dog so he does not come into contact with this spice in any form.

Cinnamon Allergies Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Has Symptoms

My pitbul is 7 months old I think she is having cinnamon allergies because she had it this morning inside the pumpkin and now her face is swollen and eyes are swollen too

Thankfully cinnamon isn’t toxic to dogs, but it may cause an allergic reaction; rinsing around the muzzle and inside the mouth to ensure that there is no residue would be a good initial step.

You could try giving some Benadryl (1mg/lb two to three times per day) to see if it helps but If the swelling gets worse, the eyes are swollen shut, there is respiratory problems or any other symptom noted on this page you should visit your Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Source: https://wagwalking.com/condition/cinnamon-allergies